Celexa, Effexor, know your drug!

When it comes to anti-depressants, and in particular Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors, one wonders if the doctors that prescribe them have any knowledge about them at all! Through my research I have discovered that doctors seem to know little about what they are prescribing on a daily basis. Let me give you some examples. A doctor once decided to prescribe an anti-depressant for the treatment of insomnia and persistent free-floating anxiety. She told the patient (and I have this from the horse’s mouth) that she would prescribe either Venlafaxine (Effexor) or citalopram (Celexa, Cipramil). When questioned she informed the patient that the side-effect profile and the ease of withdrawal were largely the same with both drugs. As anyone that does a little research can tell you, this is not true. Venlafaxine actually seems to have a much worse side-effect profile than citalopram, and due to its relatively short half life seems to be more difficult to come off (something which is not helped by there apparently not being sufficient low dose options to taper off with). What’s more, it is one of the most difficult anti-depressants to come off over all! It is a disgrace that doctors do not have this information. One wonders if they, after six years of medical school, are instantly blinded by the skilful patter of the pharmaceutical reps, accept their freebie golf trips and lunches and prescribe away. Another patient was told that if they changed the time they took their citalopram from the morning to the evening they would feel less drowsy and spaced-out. In fact there is no clinical reason why this should be the case, as the drugs stays in your system for longer than twenty-four hours. If you are considering taking any SSRI for anxiety or panic or for that matter anything else, it is of prime importance that you do your research, and go to your doctor armed with questions. They can certainly help in your battle to overcome your issues, but you need to understand what you are taking, what is likely to happen, and what your end game is.

 

 

 

RemedyFind’s depressing Anxiety Newsletter

I included the following from the Remedy Find newsletter because I find their experiences of anxiety, depression, insomnia and panic to be very drug-solution orientated. I like “RemedyFind” and the information they give. I think it is very useful to be able to read about what experiences others have had with drugs, therapies and remedies. I find, however, their newsletters deprressing to a point where they could actually be demotivating! Read it and see what you think! I took it from this link: http://www.remedyfind.com/newsletters/Aug_06_AnxietyDisorders.html I first noticed anxiety when I was in my early 20s now that I think about it. I was playing competitive sports and I would be so focused on “winning” I would try so hard and usually end up making an ass out of myself. One time I hit a ball almost over the back fence during baseball and I ran so hard I ran in place sliding on the dirt then landed on my face. I became a bit afraid of competing after similar events happened. Nothing physical had happened yet as far as anxiety goes, then one day I went to a plastic surgeon about 2 years ago and I had taken ephedrine to stay awake because I could not sleep the night before. I drank a caffeinated soda right before I went in and I received several shots of numbing medicine in my face which contained epinephrine (adrenaline). I remember the room pixellating and going black, and almost passing out and then a horrifying sensation that I was leaving my body. My heart went over 190 bpm and I leaped up and threw the doctors dressing off of me and tore off the vital monitors. The dr. rushed back in and asked what happened and when I explained he andthe nurse helped me calm down and he finished the procedure. After that I was still taking ephedrine…it was a weight loss drug and I was only taking half the dosage recommended. I noticed that after that whenever I took it and drank soda, the same thing happened. It was terrifying. I stopped taking the weight loss drug and it stopped happening in frequency but never fully stopped. I had a Holter Moniter on me, I have had an echo-treadmill to see if my heart was messed up. They found nothing and diagnosed me with panic disorder. I became extremely depressed because I did not like being tethered to “drugs” to keep me sane and I did not understand why this was happening to me. I saw several different doctors, psychologists and psychiatrists who all said the same thing-panic disorder. The feelings came out of the blue and I felt a jolt of adrenaline-which scared me-which triggered me to almost panic. Anything that made me even slightly anxious would set me off with a racing heartbeat, feeling that I was going to die which lead to the fear of death, the fear of another panic attack and at one time I could not even leave my house. I always wanted to be in a safe area that I would not have to “flee” from if it happened. It has not happened to me to any degree that would make me frightened for about 8 months or so. It started going away when I began taking Lexapro and Xanax, then it came back but not as bad. I was on Paxil briefly and discontinued it because it made me feel creepy and it scared me. I began to fear prescription drugs or became somewhat of a medi-phobe. I took Zoloft, Klonopin and an occasion Xanax for a few months and felt a lot better but could not deal with taking several Klonopin pills a day. I discontinued them and I went to see a doctor who is very understanding and helpful. Panic attacks are largely a learned behavior. Your brain learns to prepare the body to defend itself-against whatever it perceives the threat is-which is almost always bogus. At one point during the height of my anxiety problems I could not even shower because in the middle I would become afraid of nothing, my heart would race and I’d have to leap out of the shower and lay flat on the bed and calm down. Anxiety makes you hyper-aware of your bodily functions-particularly feelings in your chest. Anxiety can almost mimic a heart attack. What was happening to me for a long time was that I was hyper aware of my heart rate and I would check my pulse every few minutes all day long. It crippled me. My lifestyle did not help one bit either. I was forced to move around to areas I hated with no feeling of security, financial problems at the time escalated them, things I could not control, waking up angry every day, fearing the day, hating life in general..it all played a huge part. What finally broke the cycle for me was I had to first convince myself I was not going crazy. I bought a portable battery powered heart/ blood pressure cuff. Every time I felt funny I used it and I learned that 99 percent of the time my blood pressure was within normal range and my heart rate was as well, except when I was very anxious, it sped my heart rate up, which is perfectly normal. I went up to 150 mg of Zoloft per day and after a few weeks felt a lot better. I am still hyper aware of my body however. Every time my chest hurts, whether it be heart burn, gas, etc. makes me want to check my own vitals but I know that it is just learned behavior and that kind of behavior is incredibly hard to overcome. I am way better than I used to be. I do still get very anxious, especially 10 days out of the month..the few days before my monthly and during. My heart feels like it skips beats a lot and I try to ignore it but sometimes it upsets me. About a month and a half ago I was feeling WAY better then my horse died and I lost 2 cats and I went downhill for several weeks until recently. I know I have a long way to go with this. Staying away from caffeine helps, but that is hard to do. I slipped and have had cigarettes here and there-which doesn’t help. I feel that once I have a few more ekg’s done DURING the time my hart feels like its skipping and its found to be benign (which it most likely is) I will feel better. I do not like being tethered to 150 mg a day of Zoloft but right now it is best, even if it is having a placebo effect on me. 🙂 I keep Xanax on me now for emergencies only and an occasional Inderal -10 mg (which wouldn’t hurt a child). Inderal helps me throughout the day if I need it. The Xanax I have not used in a long time. I hear it is very addictive and my Dr. told me to not take it regularly. My Dr. referred me recently to a psychologist and I saw him once. He believed that a lot of my anxiety stems from lifestyle. I must admit my lifestyle semi-sucks but it is better than it used to be. Once I learn to relax naturally I think I will be able to be weaned off of the Zoloft. Anxiety has turned me into a person that I am not. I was outgoing, I did things, I traveled a lot, I made a lot of money. I did modeling, I did some pay per views, and posed as a “date” on a dating show for Vtv Washington, DC. (yes most of those dating shows are fake). Anxiety turned me into an angry, fearful, depressed and semi oppressive person. What I did then with relative ease and enjoyment I freak at the thought now and my goal is to get back to the person I was. The happy me. Maybe someone can find my experience with this helpful. By the way I am 31, not overweight and according to the Dr. have a clean bill of health with the exception of anxiety. My advice to anyone fighting with this would be to not give up-something WILL work and it takes patience and whatever you need to do to rectify it-do it because life it too short and if you do not take control, you will waste a lot of your life on something that can cripple you.

ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE WILL NOT TAKE AWAY YOUR FEARS

By: Stanley Popovich Your fears, anxieties, and other problems have the best of you and you don’t know where to turn for help. At some point you feel totally helpless as you struggle each day. No matter what you do, you cannot run away or hide from your fears. In these cases, some people will use alcohol or other substances to feel better. Alcohol and substance abuse or any other addictions will not take away your problems and fears. In the short run, they might make you feel better, but in the long run these addictions will only make things worse. So what do you do to make your problems and fears go away? Well, since you can’t runaway from them, then the best solution is to tackle your fears head on no matter how strong they may be. The key is to be smart in how you try to manage these fears. Here are some ways in how to manage your persistent fears and anxieties. The first step is to learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. Focus on the present and stop trying to predict what may happen next week. Next week will take care of itself. Remember that no one can predict the future with one hundred percent certainty. Even if the thing that you feared does happen there are circumstances and factors that you can’t predict which can be used to your advantage. For instance, let’s say at your place of work that you miss the deadline for a project you have been working on for the last few months. Everything you feared is coming true. Suddenly, your boss comes to your office and tells you that the deadline is extended and that he forgot to tell you the day before. This unknown factor changes everything. Remember: we may be ninety-nine percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that one percent to make a world of difference. Another technique that is very helpful is to have a small notebook of positive statements that make you feel good. Whenever you come across an affirmation that makes you feel good, write it down in a small notebook that you can carry around with you in your pocket. Whenever you feel depressed or frustrated, open up your small notebook and read those statements. This will help to manage your negative thinking. Be smart in how you deal with your fears and anxieties. Do not try to tackle everything all at once. When facing a current or upcoming task that overwhelms you with a lot of anxiety, break the task into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success. The important thing is to get the proper help by seeing a professional. Avoiding your problem through the use of alcohol or other substances will do nothing in the long run in fixing your problems. It will just make things worse. Managing your fear and anxieties will take some hard work. Be patience, persistent and stay committed in trying to solve your problem. BIOGRAPHY: Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

FINDING AND OVERCOMING THE SOURCE OF YOUR FEARS

By: Stanley Popovich A sure way to overcoming your fears and anxieties is in finding the source of your fears and being able to manage it. In dealing with any kinds of fears or anxieties, try to learn what is the real source of your fears and anxieties. Knowing what is causing your anxieties can go a long way in finding the solution. A person can find the source of his or her own fears by doing some self-evaluation and also by talking to a professional. Asking yourself questions such as: “Why am I afraid” or “What is causing my anxiety” will lead you in the right direction in finding the source of your fears. Give it some time and eventually you will find the answers your looking for. Once you find the true source of your fears, the next step is to find the solutions that will solve your problem. With the help of a professional, write down a list of possible techniques and solutions that you think will manage your fear and anxieties. The next step is to apply the techniques that you uncovered. Here is a brief list of some techniques you can use to help deal with your fears. A good way to manage your worry is to challenge your negative thinking with positive statements and realistic thinking. When encountering thoughts that make your fearful or anxious, challenge those thoughts by asking yourself questions that will maintain objectivity and common sense. Be smart in how you deal with your fears and anxieties. Do not try to tackle everything all at once. When facing a current or upcoming task that overwhelms you with a lot of anxiety, break the task into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success. Learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. When the time comes, hopefully you will have learned the skills to deal with your situation. Sometimes we encounter a scary situation that gets us all upset. When encountering these events, always remember to get all of the facts of the given situation. Gathering the facts can prevent us from relying on exaggerated and fearful assumptions. By focusing on the facts, a person can rely on what is reality and what is not. In every anxiety-related situation you experience, begin to learn what works, what doesn’t work, and what you need to improve on in managing your fears and anxieties. For instance, you have a lot of anxiety and you decide to take a walk to help you feel better. The next time you feel anxious you can remind yourself that you got through it the last time by taking a walk. This will give you the confidence to manage your anxiety the next time around. Many people try to get rid of their anxieties and fears without taking into consideration why they are afraid. The best way to get rid of your fears is to find those techniques that will manage the true source of your fears. If you can do this, then you should be able to overcome your fears and anxieties. BIOGRAPHY: Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

LEARNING HOW TO OVERCOME YOUR OUT OF CONTROL ANXIETIES

By: Stanley Popovich Learning how to manage your out of control anxieties can be extremely difficult. The first thing you need to do is to seek the services of a professional and/or counselor who can teach you how to manage your fears and give you the help that you need. In the meantime, here are some ways to cope with your fears and anxieties. The first step is to take a deep breath and try to find something to do to get your mind off of the problem. A person could take a walk, listen to some music, read the newspaper, watch TV, play on the computer or do an activity that will give you a fresh perspective on things. This will distract you from your current problem. Most importantly, doing something will give you the self- confidence that you can do your tasks and that you can get through the rest of the day. Remember that things change and events do not stay the same. For instance, you may feel overwhelmed in the mornings with your anxiety and feel that this is how you will feel the rest of the day. This isn’t correct. No one can predict the future with 100 Percent accuracy. Even if the thing that you feared does happen there are circumstances and factors that you can’t predict which can be used to your advantage. You never know when the help and answers you are looking for will come to you. Your anxiety and worry will decrease over time. Your anxieties may seem intense at the moment, but that won’t be like that forever. Your worry will eventually decrease in the long run. A good way to manage your worry is to challenge your negative thinking with positive statements and realistic thinking. When encountering thoughts that make your fearful or anxious, challenge those thoughts by asking yourself questions that will maintain objectivity and common sense. Be smart in how you deal with your fears and anxieties. Do not try to tackle everything all at once. When facing a current or upcoming task that overwhelms you with a lot of anxiety, break the task into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success. In every anxiety related situation you experience, begin to learn what works, what doesn’t work, and what you need to improve on in managing your fears and anxieties. For instance, you have a lot of anxiety and you decide to play on the computer to help you feel better. The next time you feel anxious you can remind yourself that you got through it the last time by playing on the computer. This will give you the confidence to manage your anxiety in the future. Remember that sometimes our worrying and fears can make the problem even worse. Take things in stride and try not focus too much on the problem. Patience, persistence, education, and being committed in trying to solve your problem will go along way in fixing your problems. BIOGRAPHY: Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

HOW TO OVERCOME A FEARFUL AND SCARY SITUATION

By: Stanley Popovich All most everybody worries about what will happen when they face a stressful and scary situation. The prospect of not knowing what to do can be frightening. As a result, here is a list of techniques and suggestions on how to manage the fear of an upcoming situation. The first thing a person can do is to visualize doing the scary task in their mind. For instance, you and your team have to play in the championship game in front of a large group of people in the next few days. Before the big day comes, imagine yourself playing the game in your mind. Imagine that you are playing in front of a large audience. By playing the game in your mind, you will be better prepared to perform for real when the time comes. Self-Visualization is a great way to reduce the fear and stress of a coming situation. Try to find the motivation from within before performing the task. You will be more successful if you have a solid reason for doing the task. If you are not sure why you are doing a certain task, then the fear will get the best of you. Having the motivation and enthusiasm will help you to manage the fear and increase your chances of success. When encountering a scary situation that gets us all upset, always remember to get all of the facts of the given situation. Gathering the facts can prevent us from relying on exaggerated and fearful assumptions. By focusing on the facts, a person can rely on what is reality and what is not. Take it one step at a time. Don’t try to do too much at the same time because you will be easily overwhelmed. Take it slow and go at your own pace. Remember that each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. You never know when the answers you are looking for will come to your doorstep. We may be ninety-nine percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that one percent to make a world of difference. No one can predict the future with one hundred percent certainty. Even if the thing that you feared does happen there are circumstances and factors that you can’t predict which can be used to your advantage. For instance, let’s say at your place of work that you miss the deadline for a project you have been working on for the last few months. Everything you feared is coming true. Suddenly, your boss comes to your office and tells you that the deadline is extended and that he forgot to tell you the day before. This unknown factor changes everything. Remember: we may be ninety-nine percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that one percent to make a world of difference. It is not easy to deal with the fear of the unknown, however sometimes the fear can be worse than the situation. If you have trouble managing your anxiety, then talk to someone who can make you feel better. BIOGRAPHY: Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

 

OUR FEARS AND WORRIES CAN DISTORT THE REALITY OF THE SITUATION

By: Stanley Popovich At times, our worries and anxieties can overwhelm us. In addition, our worries can distort our perception of what is reality and what is not. Here is a brief list of techniques that you can use to help gain a better perspective on things during your anxious moments. When feeling anxious, stop what you are doing and try to do something relaxing. A person should take a deep breath and try to find something to do for a few minutes to get their mind off of the problem. A person could get some fresh air, listen to some music, or do an activity that will give them a fresh perspective on things. Remember that our fearful thoughts are exaggerated and can make the problem worse. A good way to manage your worry is to challenge your negative thinking with positive statements and realistic thinking. When encountering thoughts that make your fearful or anxious, challenge those thoughts by asking yourself questions that will maintain objectivity and common sense. When overwhelmed with worry, a person may encounter a lot of scary thoughts coming at them all at once. Instead of getting upset, remember that these thoughts are exaggerated and are not based on reality. From my interviews with various professionals, I’ve learned that usually it is the fear behind the thoughts that gets us worked up. Ignore the fear behind these thoughts and your worry should decrease. Be smart in how you deal with your fears and anxieties. Do not try to tackle everything all at once. When facing a current or upcoming task that overwhelms you with a lot of anxiety, break the task into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success. Remember that all the worrying in the world will not change anything. Most of what we worry about never comes true. Instead of worrying about something that probably won’t happen, concentrate on what you are able to do. Everything else you can leave in the hands of God. In every anxiety-related situation you experience, begin to learn what works, what doesn’t work, and what you need to improve on in managing your fears and anxieties. For instance, you have a lot of anxiety and you decide to take a walk to help you feel better. The next time you feel anxious you can remind yourself that you got through it the last time by taking a walk. This will give you the confidence to manage your anxiety the next time around. It is not easy to deal with all of our fears and worries. When your fears and anxieties have the best of you, try to calm down and then get the facts of the situation. The key is to take it slow. All you can do is to do your best each day, hope for the best, and when something does happen, take it in stride. Take it one step at a time and things will work out. BIOGRAPHY: Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

 

FINDING THOSE TECHNIQUES THAT WILL MANAGE YOUR ANXIETIES

By: Stanley Popovich Are you having trouble finding effective ways to overcome your fears and anxieties? It can be difficult to find all of the answers in managing your anxieties. The best way to overcome your persistent fears is to find those coping skills that effectively mange the fear and anxiety. The first step is to take advantage of the help that is available around you. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your fears and anxieties. They will be able to provide you with additional advice and insights on how to deal with your current problem. By talking to a professional, a person will be helping themselves in the long run because they will become better able to deal with their problems in the future. It doesn’t stop there. The next step is to apply what you have learned. Make it a point that every time you experience a fearful or anxiety related situation, use the information you have learned. In every anxiety related situation you experience, begin to learn what works, what doesn’t work and what you need to do to improve on your anxiety management skills. Continue to do more research to learn of even more effective techniques in managing fear and anxiety. Remember to focus on the strategies and techniques that actually reduce the fear and anxiety. All it takes is one effective technique to make a world of difference in managing your fears. As for some of the skills that manage fear, learn to challenge your negative thinking with positive statements and realistic thinking. When encountering thoughts that make your fearful or depressed, challenge those thoughts by asking yourself questions that will maintain objectivity and common sense. Sometimes, a person may encounter a lot of scary thoughts coming at them all at once. Instead of getting upset, remember that these thoughts are exaggerated and are not based on reality. Usually it is the fear behind the thoughts that gets us worked up. Ignore the fear behind these thoughts, regardless how the strong the fear may be. If you ignore the fear behind these thoughts, then the thoughts become easier to manage. Learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. Focus on the present and stop trying to predict what may happen next week. Next week will take care of itself. Remember that alcohol and substance abuse or any other addictions will not take away your problems and fears. In the short run, they might make you feel better, but in the long run these addictions will only make things worse. The main point of this article is that no matter how difficult it is to manage your fear, the answers are out there if you look hard enough. It might take some hard work and persistence, but it is possible to find those techniques that work for you. BIOGRAPHY: Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

 

anxiety and eating habits

Were are what we eat as the old adage goes, but how does this effect panic and anxiety? There are two aspects of food that in my opinion definitely do effect anxiety and panic attacks. Obviously what we eat effects how we feel and our overall emotional state. There are many theories as to what foods we should and should not be eating. Common aggravators are: Wheat products such as bread, bagels, cakes etc Dairy products High Sugar products Caffeine and other stimulants This list should be taken with a pinch of salt. There are many cases of these foodstuffs not being related to anxiety or panic attacks in the least. It is definitely worth experimenting by cutting out those products for some time, but it may not make a difference. Far better to turn food detective and root out exactly what is causing the problem. How to do this? By keeping a note of what you eat and looking for things that seem to be problem foods. And then cutting those foods out for at least a couple of weeks to see if there is a change. Keeping a food diary can be a pain, but it is worth the struggle. The second thing to think about is your eating style. Do you wolf down arm-fulls of food and then feel bloated? Do you take big bites and swallow almost without chewing? The keywords are “amount” and “speed”. Try eating your food extra slowly. Chew over each mouthful and really taste it. If you make an effort to do it for a week you will find that you enjoy your food much more, bloat less, eat less and may notice positive changes in your mood! It is a hard thing to do after years of scoffing, but it is worth it! And it can help you lose weight as well, which can also benefit your anxiety levels! Why does it help? Fear, anxiety and mood are all thought to be linked to your stomach although the exact connection is not fully understood. Certainly less bloating gives your diaphragm more room and allows you to breath correctly!

 

ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD WILL NOT TAKE AWAY YOUR FEARS

By: Stanley Popovich

All the money in the world will not take away your fears and anxieties. You can be the most successful person in your business, however your money and success will do nothing in getting rid of your stresses and anxieties. So what do you do to make your fears and anxieties to go away? Well, since money and fame are not the answers, then the best solution is to be smart in how you manage your fears. Here are some ways in how to manage your persistent fears and anxieties.

Take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. Focus on the present and stop trying to predict what may happen next week. Next week will take care of itself.

Learn how to manage your fearful thoughts that may be difficult to manage. When experiencing a negative thought, read some positive statements and affirmations that help lift your spirits and make you feel better. Remember that your fearful thoughts may be exaggerated so balance these thoughts with realistic thinking and common sense.

Take advantage of the help that is available around you. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your fears and anxieties. They will be able to provide you with additional advice and insights on how to deal with your current problem. By talking to a professional, a person will be helping themselves in the long run because they will become better able to deal with their problems in the future. Managing your fears and anxieties takes practice. The more you practice, the better you will become.


When managing your fears and anxieties do not try to tackle everything at once. The best solution is to break your fears or problems into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success.

Remember that no one can predict the future with one hundred percent certainty. Even if the thing that you feared does happen there are circumstances and factors that you can’t predict which can be used to your advantage. For instance, let’s say at your place of work that you miss the deadline for a project you have been working on for the last few months. Everything you feared is coming true. Suddenly, your boss comes to your office and tells you that the deadline is extended and that he forgot to tell you the day before. This unknown factor changes everything. Remember: we may be ninety-nine percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that one percent to make a world of difference.

Managing your fears and anxieties will take some hard work. Sooner or later, you will have to confront your fears and anxieties. Remember that all you can do is to do your best each day, hope for the best, and take things in stride. Patience, persistence, education, and being committed in trying to solve your problem will go along way in fixing your problems.

BIOGRAPHY:


Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/